Are Global Challenges Really Global?

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About the podcast

In this episode, Ron and Joseph discuss the supply chain and logistical challenges that are supposedly global in nature. But are they really? And to what extent?

Joseph starts by sharing that none of the reported stresses in supply chain and logistics are being reported in Europe. The dozens of ships parked off the shores of Rotterdam, Hamburg, and other ports awaiting their turn to offload or onload as they do off Los Angeles and Newark simply do not exist.

Certainly, the news reports coming from the United States and as witnessed from producer to consumer indicate there is severe strain. There are images of bare shelves in the grocery stores and retailers concerned about not being able to get stock for the holiday shopping season.

But the news coming from other parts of the world and accompanying experiences tell quite a different story. In fact, there hardly seems to be much concern at all in Europe. Perhaps some of it has to do with there being much less emphasis on holiday gift shopping in Europe than in the States, so the supply-side isn’t under unusual (or noticable) strain.

Obviously, if there is a supplier-side challenge (such as with computer chips from Taiwan, China, and so on) it affects the entire world similarly. But there is no talk of “Christmas being ruined” and no pain being felt by consumers anywhere but in the States. So what gives?

Ron and Joseph offer their insights into what’s happening at the ports around the world, the availability of truck-drivers, chassis, and warehousing; what differences there are between the States and Europe, and how the challenges can be overcome (or endured).

Hosts:Ron Leibman – Senior logistics executive, Lawyer for 22 years
Joseph Paris – Founder of the OpEx Society & The XONITEK Group of Companies
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